Medical Marijuana in Georgia? Don’t hold your breath

Georgia Regents University, Augusta, Georgia 11/12/14
Georgia Regents University, Augusta, Georgia 11/12/14

By Dean Sines and Raoul Duke III

When it comes to medical marijuana in Georgia, it appears that the patients may be on the back burner.

When the Study Committee on Prescription Medical Cannabis for Serious Medical Conditions held their most recent Joint Study Committee Hearing in Augusta, Georgia on November 12, the topic of revenue and money making took the front seat in the discussion.

The message sent to those in attendance was that profit outweighed the lives saved by the medicinal properties of cannabis.

Sen. Renee Unterman continuously asked questions within the meeting that displayed a sense that profit trumped the lives that could be saved by this legislation.

The topics of safe access for patients and how many patients could benefit were ignored by the committee while questions about how the state could generate revenue from medical marijuana were at the forefront.

The seriousness of the committee on the topic of medicinal marijuana was shaken to the core as the committee assumed the role of research state.

The problem with the committee wanting to become the pioneers in the field of medical marijuana research is that there has been plenty of research already done in the field. One cannot be a pioneer if the landscape has already been explored and defined.

Furthermore, the committee's desire to contract GW Pharmaceuticals to grow and manufacture the CBD oil for research studies in the state is an affront on the legitimacy of their motives.

Combine the desire to involve this corporate agenda with the fact that the committee is only wanting 250-300 participants for said studies allows even the lay person to understand that these hearings are a farce.

How can the committee admit that 93,000 Georgians could possibly benefit from this medicine and then only allow 250-300 participants in their studies?

The logic is lost on those who have championed the effort to reform marijuana laws, the American people, Georgians and the patients whose lives could be dramatically changed for the better by allowing its safe access and use.

The timeline that the committee set is also flawed in its basic assumption. The committee stated that they wanted the medical marijuana studies to start in 2016 and last for two to five years before they made their decision on whether or not Georgians could benefit from cannabis.

How many lives will be lost during this unneeded time span? How many children will succumb to their maladies before those in power deem this medicine appropriate?

The answer, even if it is one, is too many.

The constituents of Georgia need to ask themselves and their representatives whether they are attempting to save lives or simply cash in on the marijuana market.

We, the people, must take a stand to help educate those who are not aware of the benefits this plant can offer to our society as a whole. We must take a stand to stop our representatives from beating around the bush when the stakes are so high. We must make the changes that will lead to the repeal of marijuana prohibition.

About Author

Sharon is a wife, mother, caregiver, business owner and life long resident of Georgia. Her eyes were opened when her family was traumatized by the “War on Drugs”, she uses her ears to listen to other victims and her voice to tell their stories and educate others on the direct and indirect harms of prohibition and how it affects us all.

Sharon has been a guest on numerous radio stations across the country as well as local and regional TV news affiliates. As well as LadyBud Magazine, HighTimes Magazine and Main Street. She was recently nominated by Mass/Cann NORML for National Female Activist of the Year. Sharon has traveled the country speaking on various topics including drug policy, activism, southern strategies and harm reduction. She produces a segment on 420radio.com highlighting the stories and work of other women in the fight to end marijuana prohibition.

(4) Comments

  1. Rick Raines

    I listened to Tommy Chong on the Fox today and he made a very astute observation that all cannabis use is medical. Recreational use is like the R and R in the military. That rest and recreation allows the soul to heal. We need to bypass these chumps. Educate your children about cannabis and how their representatives are racist,bigoted, self serving assholes who don’t deserve their attention or respect. Teach them to walk their own path with knowledge and treat any elected official according to their actions not their words.

  2. Jim

    Georgia, the state that has a church every square mile, but has some if the most evil people in the country. Isn’t god about love, compassion and healing. I think Georgians should concentrate on educating all of the preachers, pastors or heads of churches on the evil they are perpetuating by incarcerating cannabis users. It’s as if Georgia is living in medevil times. The evil church people run the show in the south. You’ll never out vote them in Georgia. Educating them isn’t working either, the only option left is to beg them, thats what a good slave does. Only when the fed gives permission will Georgians be allowed to legally consume cannabis. Even then most of GA will probably be a dry state. I’ve stoped. Smoking herb a year ago. I have a famillly that I would miss if i was locked up for herbs. I have been saving my money and will be moving out of GA soon. Southern Orgeon looks like a nice friendy place. It’s a shame, I really like GA, and have met some nice people here but I have combat injuries and I would rather consume cannabis than continue taking the poison the VA prescribes.

    1. Ebony

      I agree!

  3. augustlibertarianRocky Eades

    Actually, I hope that lots of people make lots of money in a free market for medical marijuana. People making money in a free market will drive innovation in treatments, treatment delivery, product safety and will lead to more people getting better medicine at lower prices. On the other hand, the system of regulation, taxation and licensing favored by liberals/progressives/conservatives – like all such regulatory/taxation/licensing schemes – will concentrate the money into the hands of a few, will stifle innovation, will limit the market for treatment and will result in higher prices.

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